Author Archives: Craig Moore

About the Author

Craig Moore is Service Director, Marketing Operations Strategies, at SiriusDecisions. His three decades of experience span such areas as marketing operations, partner marketing, strategic alliances, product marketing and management, software development and entrepreneurship. Follow Craig on Twitter @cramoore.

Big Data and Analytics: Five Foundational Elements

In my previous post, I explained what b-to-b marketers can gain from using advanced analytics. But because many marketers lack the foundation for planning, implementing and using big data, adoption of advanced analytics remains low. Without putting in place the required elements for an analytics foundation, marketers will continue to find that fulfilling the promise of big data’s benefits is out of reach. To get the most leverage from their analytics efforts, organizations must first ensure the following five elements are in place:

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Why Bother With Advanced Analytics?

There’s no shortage of discussion about the possibilities of big data and advanced analytics for today’s b-to-b marketers. Sales and marketing analytics covers a spectrum of data and techniques, from historical to exploratory to predictive analysis. Historical analysis, which examines past activities or results across a range of categories, is used to report on marketing and sales performance, monitor process compliance and improve future effectiveness. Exploratory analysis conducts what-if analysis to identify scenarios that may result in improved outcomes. Predictive analysis uses the outputs of historical and exploratory analysis to anticipate outcomes and find the best ways to improve effectiveness. Big data plays a role in all three forms of analysis, although more so in exploratory and predictive analysis.

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Maybe You Already Have Enough Data for Analytics: Part IV: How Much Historical Data Do You Need?

During a recent roundtable discussion with a group of b-to-b marketing analytics experts, participants discussed how much historical data is needed for effective marketing mix and predictive modeling efforts. The answer is relevant to any marketing operations person interested in expanding into analytics, either through building a team of data analysts and data scientists or using the services of outside companies that provide modeling and analysis. Some participants said that, in order to generate accurate and complete analyses, the minimum requirement is 24 to 36 months of data about marketing tactics, opportunities moving through the pipeline, and deals won and lost. This sounds reasonable, considering that past performance can be a predictor of future performance. However, here are three reasons why you don’t need that much information to get started:

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Maybe You Already Have Enough Data for Analytics: Part III: Marketing Mix Analysis

In my previous posts, I discussed marketing touch analysis as a way to find out which of your tactics are most involved in the process of getting to closed deals. Now I’ll show you how a little math magic can be used to predict better performance. Marketing mix modeling started in the consumer-marketing world from the desire to know if and how different marketing techniques drive sales. Organizations executed a series of marketing tactics and looked at the results, perhaps in a region or among a group of stores. Using data mining methods and correlation techniques, including regression analysis, they could associate changes in marketing tactics with increased sales. Should the cereal be high or low on the shelf? Is a television ad in this market associated with higher sales of this product?

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Maybe You Already Have Enough Data for Analytics: Part II: More Insight With Touch Analysis

In my last post, I described marketing touch analysis and how to use this information to “do more of what works, and less of what doesn’t.” Today, I add more variety to the approach and explain how to gain better insight into the effectiveness of your marketing tactics. I promise to keep the rocket science out of this discussion to help you better understand what this stuff is and how it can help you with your work. There are pragmatic ways you can take advantage of these techniques without a staff of scientists.

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Maybe You Already Have Enough Data for Analytics: Marketing Touch Analysis

B-to-b marketers are beginning to analyze the performance of their marketing tactics over time, across segments, personas, geographies and product categories in order to determine tactic effectiveness. The most straightforward approach to this is marketing touch analysis, which tracks the interactions of individuals with marketing tactics on a plotted graph.

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Marketing and IT: A Lovefest?

I attended the Marketing Operations Cross Company Alliance (MOCCA) Executive Forum last week in San Francisco. For those of you who are not familiar with this group, it is composed of people in marketing operations leadership roles, primarily in b-to-b companies. True to its Silicon Valley roots, members mostly come from technology companies, although MOCCA’s ranks are growing with companies from other industries. There are two chapters, one based on the West Coast and one in Washington, D.C. We held an interesting Oxford-style debate on the topic of whether the “ownership” of marketing technology should be with IT or the marketing organization. One side took the position that marketing should be the absolute ruler of its technology and IT should butt out, and the opposing position was that IT was far better staffed and equipped to plan, procure and manage technology than marketing.

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Campaign Planning: Balancing Long-Term Vision and Short-Term Goals

Marketers who are setting out on a path to develop integrated campaigns are challenged to balance the desire to address customer needs against the pragmatic realities of ensuring they’re promoting the offerings that can be sold and delivered in the near term. It’s a tough balance because we want our marketers to move beyond seeing the world from the view of the current portfolio of offerings and focus on meeting customer needs. However, sales organizations want marketing to also drive interest around offerings they can forecast and sell.

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Microsoft Acquires MarketingPilot

Microsoft has announced the acquisition of MarketingPilot to bolster its Microsoft Dynamics CRM business. This is the second marketing software acquisition in a week (ExactTarget acquired Pardot on October 11 for $95.5 million), putting an exclamation point on the importance of marketing technology solutions. This acquisition also signals Microsoft’s intention to do more in the rapidly growing market for marketing applications.

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Balancing Campaigns and Launches

More and more, we find marketers adopting an integrated campaign strategy to drive increased sales productivity and marketing efficiency. An integrated campaign is built on a business-needs-based theme, and it runs for an extended duration (usually a year). Within the campaign is a series of carefully choreographed reputation, demand creation, sales enablement and market intelligence activities. When multiple products are folded into a single campaign, marketing messages shift from a focus on products, features and benefits to a focus on the relationship between the prospective buyer’s business needs and the value proposition of the campaign’s offerings. They can be more impactful to the business overall, but they do not make the direct product push that product managers are used to.

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